Japanese gaming giant Nintendo has been put under increasing pressure to join the mobile gaming race. Hedge fund manager Seth Fischer from the Hong Kong-based Oasis Management company, which own shares in the game, even wrote to Nintendo urging them to develop and sell games on the iOS and Android platforms.

“Nintendo needs to embrace this thematic change in consumer demand, behaviour and expectations to stay relevant,” stated Fischer in the letter to Nintendo Chief Executive Satoru Iwata. “It is readily apparent that the standard elasticity of demand principle no longer applies in the consumer entertainment market when access requires the purchase of a physical product.”

Investors have been attempting to move the company on from only making games exclusively for their console devices. With the sales forecasts for the Wii U console being slashed recently, the pressure is mounting for Nintendo to change their long-term strategy.

With the debut of Sony’s PlayStation 4 in Japan, sales of the portable 3DS console is expected to slow further as well. While Nintendo launched the new Dragon Quest Monsters title in preparation for the PS4 launch, it appears to be making little difference.

With Wii U sales dying, Nintendo cannot rely on the 3DS to back the company up. A recent report by App Annie found that game revenues from the App Store and Google Play were three times higher than the hand-held video gaming market in the third quarter of last year.

Analysts have stated that this “dramatic shift in game spending on mobile” could be down to a number of factors. Not only does the multi-functionality of smartphones make them more appealing to users, but both the App Store and Google Play have a vast library of gaming content. With free and low priced titles, as well as access to the latest Canadian games at Royal Vegas, more and more players are choosing the mobile platform over more expensive handheld games.

However, Nintendo appear to be firm in their decision not to enter the mobile market. Concerns over the control schemes and wider access to their exclusive franchises such as Mario and Legend of Zelda, has seen the company opt for a plan more focused on innovating the health gaming sector.

“With games like Mario and Donkey Long, the control input is such an important part of that; I think if you’re trying to replicate that feeling of control that you have traditional to those games, translating those to a smart device, that’s just a really, really difficult task,” said Nintendo producer Kensuke Tanabe.

schemes and wider access to their exclusive franchises such as Mario and Legend of Zelda, has seen the company opt for a plan more focused on innovating the health gaming sector.

“With games like Mario and Donkey Long, the control input is such an important part of that; I think if you’re trying to replicate that feeling of control that you have traditional to those games, translating those to a smart device, that’s just a really, really difficult task,” said Nintendo producer Kensuke Tanabe.

“Of course I’m not ignoring the fact that the marketplace is flooded with these devices and that there are a lot of games created specifically for them. Personally, as I mentioned earlier, I don’t have a curiosity of or feeling of needing to create or wanting to create games for those devices. I want Nintendo games to be played on Nintendo hardware.”